Its Official – We’re Climbing Mt Rainier for the CureAlzheimer’s Fund

And we are bit intimidated...

Mt. Rainier is 14,411 feet above sea level. The summit is topped by two volcanic craters and it is the most glaciated peak in the lower 48 states. Basically it is giant popsicle that could explode at any moment. Sounds like we should climb it to raise money for the CureAzheimer’s Fund. If you would like to donate to this great cause or just learn more about the fund and the challenge, click HERE.

Four members of Team BoomerangFit will be doing just that on September 25th, 2018. The members of the team use challenges like this climb, our 2016 climb of Mt Baker, our Spartan Obstacle Racing Trifecta and many smaller challenges and races along the way to keep us motivated to stay fit even as we enter our 50s and 60s.

If you are not happy with your weight or your fitness, there is no reason that you can’t get back to the fitness you dream of or have enjoyed in the past even at our age. The keys to success are 1) Commitment – you need to commit to improvement and you need to have a reason WHY? What is your why? To see your children grow up, achieve your potential, give back to a charity. What is your why?  2) Discipline – Discipline is really just being a disciple to something greater than yourself. And, this just comes right back to your why. What drives your discipline? 3) Accountability – Once you make a commitment and start implementing your discipline, you need someone or something to hold you accountable. It could be an app or a friend or your neighbor. Somehow you need to see and review your short term and long term goals regularly. 4) Community – find other people to go along for the ride, share the ups and downs and support you when you need it. Here at Boomerangfit we are committed to helping ourselves and others achieve their potential, working together, playing together, holding each other accountable and having a whole lot of fun.

If would you like to join our group or just want to get our newsletter and see what crazy things we are up to, how we eat, how we work out and how we drive ourselves to be better even at our age, then click HERE to register for the mailing list.

If you would like to donate money to help rid the earth of the scourge that is Alzheimer’s Disease, then click HERE to donate.

Unbreakable Runner – What is CrossFit Endurance?

At 54 years old, I still run, work out, hike, paddle board, play ultimate frisbee and climb. I also compete periodically in events such as my upcoming StoneCat Trail Marathon to test myself and to raise money for charities such as The Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. The problem of course is how do you the find the time.

After reading two books, I think I have figured it out to a large extent.

The first book is called Fit After Fifty by legendary coach Joe Friel.  Coach Friel’s primary advice is to focus on more intensity less often and more recovery. The BoomerangFit blog has a lengthy review of the book HERE. 

The second book is called the Unbreakable Runner: Unleash the Power of Strength & Conditioning for a Lifetime of Running Strong.  This book is by Brian MacKenzie and TJ Murphy. For those of you who haven’t heard of Brian, he is a well know strength and conditioning expert who came up with an innovate system called Cross Fit Endurance. Again the premise here is that endurance training, in this case for all ages, needs to focus on form, cadence, strength and stamina and not just on the long slow distance that is still so popular with most people. Running long regularly especially without the proper form or core and leg strength is a recipe for injury. 

With CrossFit Endurance, I am focusing a lot of form and cadence while running. Intuitively I know that I need to have a faster turnover and to strike the ground with my forefoot. However, with practice and strength improvement, I can’t keep that up over a long run. I am constantly reminding myself to forefoot strike only to go back to heel strike when my attention wanders. It has to be subconscious or built into a patter over time through repetition. And, this pattern needs to be supported by the strength primarily in the feet or lower legs necessary to do it correctly at scale.

Additionally, I am spending a lot more time focusing on functional fitness than I ever have for running. The book, as you might guess, recommends CrossFit like workouts but I find I can do other things as well such as kettlebells or just doing burpees and carrying heavy things around the yard.

Can you work out too hard?

Yes. You can work out too hard for a whole slew of reasons.

The NY Times focuses on one of these reasons in an article entitled: “As Workouts Intensify, a Harmful Side Effect Grows More Common“. One woman highlighted in the article suffered some serious consequences from what should have been just a hard day at the spin studio.

“Over the next two days, her legs throbbed with excruciating pain, her urine turned a dark shade of brown, and she felt nauseated. Eventually she went to a hospital, where she was told she had rhabdomyolysis, a rare but life-threatening condition often caused by extreme exercise. It occurs when overworked muscles begin to die and leak their contents into the bloodstream, straining the kidneys and causing severe pain.” Ouch. This does not sound good.

So were you right all along and all of this workout nonsense was a lie? Is sitting on the couch safer? Not really. You should “workout” or exercise everyday if possible. You just need to remember two things first:

1) Fitness – what am I trying to get fit for? Do I want to play with my kids/grandkids without huffing and puffing? Do I want to ride my bike in the summer charity ride each year? Do I want to do better in summer ultimate or do I want to win my age category and some fitness-related sporting event. Have a serious chat with yourself to figure out where you should start your journey back to fitness. If you are looking to compete at a high level no matter what your age, consider getting a coach to help you build a plan and recognize problems and injuries.

2) Adapt – take your time getting into your new regime. Work your way up slowly, perhaps adding 10% or less of weight, resistance, time etc to your work outs each week. Take at least a day off a week to recover with some walking or yoga. Listen to your body and cut back when you are aware of over training symptoms such as elevated heart rate while working out (higher than usual), elevated heart rate when you wake up in the morning (take it every morning for a week to get a baseline) or are you having trouble sleeping? More ornery than usual? (Be honest).

So workout good. Workout too much and too soon less good.

If you are interested in more content like this to motivate you to get back to the fitness you once had,  Click HERE to sign up for their newsletter.

Why I came back to New Balance

I started running seriously in about 1975. When I say running seriously, I mean not just running away from something like my friends or my brother, but running towards something, in my case I was trying to lose weight and wanted to eventually compete in high school cross country.

Back in that day there were many different running shoes to choose from, however the shoe of choice on my cross country team at the time was New Balance. I don’t remember the name or number of the style and if I remember correctly they only had one anyway. It was pretty cool looking for the time and they worked well. I felt fast. This was also back in the time when if your shoe soles wore out, you just loaded on some Shoe Goo and kept going. Do they still make that stuff? We wouldn’t have dreamed – or been able to afford – replacing shoes more than maybe once a year.

Later in the 80s while going through college and the inevitable post college “I never weighed this much before so I better get back to running” phase, my commitment and nostalgia for New Balance wavered and I tried other shoes like Nikes, Saucony’s and even ASICS. I regularly tried new brands and new models but never found what I was looking for elsewhere.

Now that I have returned to the fitness fold and have again become “serious” about fitness, I have returned to my home with New Balance. It doesn’t hurt that they are a local company where I live near Boston. The real reason however is that they have a number of models that are just very comfortable at a reasonable price and that fit well with my focus on running, hiking, functional fitness and climbing.

I started with the New Balance Minimus for functional training. I do a lot of kettlebells, deadlifts, carrying things, crawling, burpees, etc. And it is important to have a small or zero drop to keep my body aligned and the Minimus works really well for this. It is also lightweight and pretty sturdy.

Next I decided to get back to running. To avoid injury, I wanted a lot of padding but I also didn’t want something that was unstable and mushy. I tried a few other shoes but ended up trying the New Balance Vazee Pace 2. This shoe had amazing padding but somehow without the bulk of the other shoes. I have two pair now one for crappy weather and one for nice weather.

As a former cross country runner, after I had gotten back into running, I started to crave the trails. So I went back to New Balance and came up with the Vazee Summit Trail V2. These shoes have some great traction and great padding but still have great stability.  This November I will be running the StoneCat Trail Marathon and these will be my go to shoe.

Finally, I have started climbing mountains as well to raise money for the CureAlzeimer’s Fund. In order to train for the mountains, I started doing some very vertical hikes carrying a lot of weight. For this I chose the New Balance Leadville.  The Leadville is also a trail running shoe but I found it to be substantial enough for hiking as well even with a heavy backpack. As a matter of fact, I hiked to base camp at 7000 ft on Mt Baker with about a 75 lbs pack using just the Leadvilles.

What shoes do you use and why?

Disclaimer – I do not receive any compensation from New Balance.  

If you are interested in more content like this to motivate you to get back to the fitness you once had,  Click HERE to sign up for their newsletter.

 

 

 

 

What does a Stone Cat have to do with Alzheimer’s?

The Stone Cat Marathon and 50 mile trail races take place at Willowdale State Forest in Ipswich, MA. This year it happens on November 4th.  The name seems to have come from a brand of beer that might have originally sponsored the event or at least been imbibed afterwards. There is also a myth about a “stoned” cat that may or may not have been found wandering around the course at some point. This raises the question of how a cat gets stoned? Cat nip?

Either way, this year Team BoomerangFit will be participating this year in the Stone Cat Trail Marathon (26.2 miles) in order to raise money for the CureAlzeimer’s Fund.  If you want to join us in the run to raise money, you can register HERE. Registration is limited however so decide quick and let us know.

Alzheimer’s disease is a horrific fate for anyone, and I know this first hand because my grandmother, my mother, my aunt as well as several neighbors and friends have either died from or are now suffering from this horrible disease.

Today, 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, up to 16 million will have the disease. Payments for care in 2012 were estimated to be $200 billion. Without a cure, these figures will nearly triple by the year 2050 and most likely bankrupt the healthcare system as we know it.

Since its founding, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed more than $56,000,000 to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for a number of key breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. Fully 100 percent of funds raised by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund go directly to research—the Board of Directors covers all overhead expenses.

If you have been touched by Alzheimer’s Disease or simply want to help defeat this awful disease, please click HERE to donate.

 

How a puppy can help improve your hip mobility?

And other crazy tips to stay fit

WARNING: I have just recently rescued a puppy from a shelter here in Boston. This may or may not have been a good decision. But so far we are very happy.

An unexpected benefit of getting a new puppy however has been an increase in hip mobility. How did this happen?

If you have ever had a puppy or even a human baby, you will be familiar with gates that are used to prevent them from going places. We now have gates and fences both inside and out to corral the little thing (her name is Lucy and she is an unknown mix of breeds). These gates and fences require me to lift up my feet fairly high to step over so I don’t have to continually take them down or open their impossible little doors. The repeated lifting up of both legs have increased my hip mobility demonstrably.  (The yoga hasn’t hurt either but thats a different post.)

The larger point is that you don’t have to commit large periods of time each day to your health.  Small little actions throughout the day can also have a measurable impact. Examples of this include stepping over the gates, taking the stairs where possible, getting a standing desk, taking a short walk after lunch, stand up during meetings or better yet do some squats or lunges during conference calls. You get the idea.

What kind of things do you or could you do every day to make progress? Comment below so that we can all learn.

Also click HERE to get access to information, inspiration, motivation, reviews of books and equipment, interviews with masters athletes, coaches and other experts, tips and tricks as well as an invitation to participate in virtual and physical challenges to increase motivation and raise money for charities such as the CureAlzheimer’s Fund.

Why the world is really in trouble?

Hint: It has nothing to do with Donald Trump

Climate change, taxes and health insurance and all of the other hot button issues of the moment are certainly important to the long-term success of our country and our world.

However, there are perhaps more imminent threats to our society that have less to do with Donald Trump and more to do with health, nutrition, exercise, inflammation, obesity and disease.

According to a new study published on July 6th, 2017 in the New England Journal of Medicine
, “more than 2 billion adults and children globally are overweight or obese and suffer health problems because of their weight.” That is Billion with a “B” and that is 30% of the entire world! And it is getting worse.

Furthermore, “the United States has the greatest percentage of obese children and young adults among the 195 countries and territories included in the study.”  We fret about destroying our children’s future with climate change and government debt, but what if they don’t live long enough to find out?

This isn’t just about weight gain or body mass index either. Diseases like cardiovascular disease and diabetes that are essentially directly linked to obesity and metabolic syndrome are growing as well. And, other diseases with indirect links to obesity, metabolic syndrome and nutrition like Cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease are also growing rapidly.

For example, today, 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, up to 16 million will have the disease. According to the CureAlzheimer’s Fund, payments for care in 2012 were estimated to be $200 billion. Without a cure, these figures will nearly triple by the year 2050 and would most likely bankrupt the healthcare system as we know it.

Alzheimer’s Disease alone could bankrupt the healthcare system. Then add in growing rates of Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and the aging baby boom and it seems that we might just be re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic arguing over insurance premiums.

So what do we do? The easy answer is eat right and exercise more. In a nut shell, if the food or food-like substance is advertised on TV then you probably should eat less of it or cut it out completely. If it has a label that includes ingredients that you don’t recognize then don’t eat it. In general just eat less processed food and sugar. Oh and move more, stand up, walk, etc.

But we all know this isn’t easy or we would all do it. So, I have started a group called BoomerangFit that is focused primarily on helping people in their 40s and above including myself to eat better, get fit, reduce the likelihood of getting struck by disease and increasing the likelihood of enjoying a long, energetic and active life.

As a part of this group, you will get access to information, inspiration, motivation, reviews of books and equipment, interviews with masters athletes, coaches and other experts, tips and tricks as well as an invitation to participate in virtual and physical challenges to increase motivation and raise money for charities such as the CureAlzheimer’s Fund. If you would like to start today towards a healthier future for you and our world, click HERE.

How are you different and why does it matter?

Getting fit can mean something different for everyone

How many people have a New Year’s Resolution to get fit or lose weight?

What does that mean? Since we are all different, it should mean something a little different for everyone. First of all, you need to set some reasonable doable goals and second you need to create some metrics and activities to hold yourself accountable and to measure your success.

Lets start with fitness or getting fit. Get fit for what? To run a marathon, to walk up and down the stairs in you house or to keep up with your kids or grandkids on the sledding hill.  This could be anything from lowering your PR in that marathon to not having to stop on the stairs to catch your breath on the way up.  If you reach the goal early, just set another one. Make them reasonable and measurable.

If you don’t think you can do it because your too old or too broken, think again. Jere’ Longman recently profiled, Ed Whitlock in the NY Times. Ed is an 85 year old runner who recently ran a marathon in under 4 hours. In fact, Ed was the first person older than 70 to have run a marathon under 3 hours. This is amazing and should be sufficient to get you off the couch no matter how old you are.

Now on to weight loss. Is weight loss your actual goal or are you more interested in how you feel or how you look in clothes. Again everyone is different. If you work out enough and eat right you could gain muscle and lose fat but not lose any weight as muscle weighs more than fat. So perhaps the right metric isn’t the scale but perhaps it is a measuring tape or your favorite pants that don’t fit anymore. If your doctor told you to lose weight, ask why? Is it to lower your cholesterol or blood pressure? You can probably do both of those things using nutrition and exercise without necessarily losing weight.

The final question is what do you mean by eat right or proper nutrition. Again, everyone is different. Some people are Vegans or vegetarians, others will never stop eating meat. One thing it seems everyone can agree on though is to eat less added sugar and processed foods. Start there and see how it works. Add it 3-4 times a week of exercise at some level and then just continue to add on as you improve or get bored. Good Luck!

Comment below on what your resolutions are for 2017?

Click Subscribe Here to get notified of new information, blog posts and exclusive offers.

Could Five Minutes Change Your Life?

office-walking

Many of us work all day at an office and sit down for most of that time. Recently, we have heard that sitting is the new smoking and that we need to stand up all day, maybe even buy a standing desk.

Full disclosure: I use a standing desk and find it to be worthwhile. You can find out more about that HERE. A new study, however, has found that you might not need to go that far.

According to a study cited in a recent NY Times article by Gretchen Reynolds, “standing up and walking around for five minutes every hour during the workday could lift your mood, combat lethargy without reducing focus and attention, and even dull hunger pangs”.

“The study, which also found that frequent, brief walking breaks were more effective at improving well-being than a single, longer walk before work, could provide the basis for a simple, realistic New Year’s exercise resolution for those of us bound to our desks all day.”

Click Subscribe Here to get notified of new information, blog posts and exclusive offers.

Get Up, Stand Up, Stand Up for Your Life

What one exercise can help you live longer?

screen-shot-2016-12-23-at-2-45-09-pmTo paraphrase the classic Bob Marley song, being able to get up off the floor, to stand from a sitting position, can be a great predictor of how long you will live.

In a article I just found in Outside Magazine entitled Why You Need to Be Doing BurpeesMichael Joyner MD from the Mayo Clinic sites a study from Brazil that indicates that “there was a clear relationship between how easy it was for people to get off the floor and how long they lived.” If you are interested in the study, click through above to the Outside article and there is a link.

Dr Joyner goes on to say that Grip Strength is another great predictor of longevity. Additionally, in my experience balance is another skill that will go quickly as you age if you don’t stay on top of it.

So, what can you do? Are just doomed to dwindle away with old age? NO.

As the article’s title implies, if you want to get good at or stay good at getting up and down off the floor then you should practice. Here’s some ideas:

  1. Good old fashioned burpees. If you don’t now what a burpee is, HERE is a link to a great instructional video courtesy of the coaches at the Spartan Obstacle Race group. If you don’t know what Spartan Race is, you should check it out HERE and you should go try one. There are races all over the country as well as coaches certified to help you succeed all on their website. I have done 5 of them so far and they are a great challenge to get you off the couch.
  2. Turkish Get Ups. The Turkish Get Up is a fairly old exercise that I found out about when I got my Kettle Bell Certification through the RKC. HERE is a video that shows you the steps. Try it with no weight at first and then you can add weights via a kettle bell or dumb bell.
  3. Just get up and down off of the floor. No Frills. Lie down on your stomach and stand up. Lie down on your back and then stand up. Or, as I learned at seminar from legendary coach Dan John, challenge yourself to get up and down off the floor using only one arm or no arms, etc. Mix it up. Take your time and when this gets easy try the two exercises above.

So what about Balance and Grip Strength. Well, balance can be improved by the drills above as well as simply standing on one foot, or standing on one foot and closing your eyes. Try standing on one foot and closing your eyes while you brush your teeth. As for Grip Strength, get a something grip while sitting at your desk or in the car like a tennis ball or grip strength device like the Captains of Crush Gripper. Or, simply hang from a bar, do pull ups or dead lifts.

What exercises do you do everyday?

Click Subscribe Here to get notified of new information, blog posts and exclusive offers.