How to make 2018 your best year ever?

And this time really make it happen...

Have you been promising yourself to lose weight, get fitter, run a marathon, climb the stairs without having to rest at the top or whatever over and over and over again, year after year?

Join the club. According US News and World Report, 80% of New Years Resolutions fail by February. February. That is only about 31 days after you made the commitment presumably on New Year’s Eve albeit when drinking may have been a factor.

So assuming you are still interested in improving yourself somehow, here are some ways to finally make it happen in 2018. If you want help staying with a program this year and finally hitting those goals, CLICK HERE to sign up for the BoomerangFit newsletter and mailing list now.

Goals – You need a small number of attainable, reasonable and measurable goals. One common model for this is SMART Goals. This model dictates that goals must be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Results-Focused and Time Bounded. I want to be fitter or look better in 2018 is not so great. I want to lose a certain number of pounds by a specific date is better assuming this doesn’t require you to lose much more than 2 lbs. per week. Also, WHY you want to achieve these goals is very important and will get you out of bed on the coldest, darkest winter mornings. Do I want to lose weight to live longer to see my daughter be married? Do I want to lose weight to have more energy to start my dream business? Tie your goals to something deep inside of you to add motivation. You should only have 1-3 goals so you don’t lose focus. There will be more on setting and keeping goals as part of the BoomerangFit site and Facebook page.

Act – Now do something. Sure it matters what you do but it probably matters more that you just do something that drives you towards your goals every day. If you are trying to lose weight, just start out by cutting out added sugar or cutting out one can of soda, then move up from there. If you want to get fitter, perhaps you walk for 20 minutes everyday or workout every day. Just start somewhere and check in with yourself everyday. There will be plenty more information on how to get fitter in 2018 on the BoomerangFit website and Facebook page.

Events or Sub-Goal – A great way to keep motivated is to have sub-goals that build up to your goal. If I want to run a marathon at the end of the year, I might want to sign up for a half marathon over the summer or in the fall. Sign up now. Post them to your social media. Invite your friends to participate. Put it on your calendar or on the wall of your room. Team BoomerangFit will be doing a number of

Regular Review – Now that you have your SMART goals in place, some events on the calendar and are doing something every single day that moves you towards your goals, you need to regularly review them to see how you are doing against your original goals, is what you are doing working, do you need to make changes to be more successful, etc. I would suggest that everyday as part of a morning ritual you read or better write your goals into a journal along with what you plan on doing that day to get closer to your goals and what you are grateful for in life. Then weekly and monthly you should take a little time to take stock of where you are against your goals, what you want to accomplish over the next week or month and then crates some actions for yourself to add to your daily practice. For example, I started by walking 20 minutes a day but this has gotten easy so now I want to up it to 40 minutes or maybe I try to run for 20 minutes.

Accountability – It is very important to build accountability into your life. The Regular Review above is a great start but you need to reach outside yourself as well. You can work with your spouse or another loved one. You can bet a friend from high school or there are even websites and apps that will help you here. You can also join Team BoomerangFit to keep you accountable. We will have a lot of information and feedback on how to stay on your goals in 2018.

Community – Finally find other people with the same goals and share the fun. Team BoomerangFit is a group of Baby Boomers looking to get back to the fitness they had earlier in life and to continue achieving goals at this stage in life. Consider joining our team to see if it can be helpful. The website and newsletter will include motivation, interviews with coaches and other members, reviews of gear, book reviews and much more.

Good luck in 2018. If you would like to receive regular information, news, ideas, motivation, etc to help you reach your goals in 2018, CLICK HERE to sign up for our newsletter and mailing list.

Its Official – We’re Climbing Mt Rainier for the CureAlzheimer’s Fund

And we are bit intimidated...

Mt. Rainier is 14,411 feet above sea level. The summit is topped by two volcanic craters and it is the most glaciated peak in the lower 48 states. Basically it is giant popsicle that could explode at any moment. Sounds like we should climb it to raise money for the CureAzheimer’s Fund. If you would like to donate to this great cause or learn more about the fund and the challenge, click HERE.

Three members of Team BoomerangFit will be doing just that on September 25th, 2018. The team use challenges like this climb, our 2016 climb of Mt Baker, our Spartan Obstacle Racing Trifecta and many smaller challenges and races along the way to keep us motivated to stay fit even as we enter our 50s and 60s.

If you are not happy with your weight or your fitness, there is no reason that you can’t get back to the fitness you dream of or have enjoyed in the past even at our age. The keys to success are 1) Commitment – you need to commit to improvement and you need to have a reason WHY? What is your why? To see your children grow up, achieve your potential, give back to a charity. What is your why?  2) Discipline – Discipline is really just being a disciple to something greater than yourself. And, this just comes right back to your why. What drives your discipline? 3) Accountability – Once you make a commitment and start implementing your discipline, you need someone or something to hold you accountable. It could be an app or a friend or your neighbor. Somehow you need to see and review your short term and long term goals regularly. 4) Community – find other people to go along for the ride, share the ups and downs and support you when you need it. Here at Boomerangfit we are committed to helping ourselves and others achieve their potential, working together, playing together, holding each other accountable and having a whole lot of fun.

If would you like to join our group or just want to get our newsletter and see what crazy things we are up to, how we eat, how we work out and how we drive ourselves to be better even at our age, then click HERE to register for the mailing list.

If you would like to donate money to help rid the earth of the scourge that is Alzheimer’s Disease, then click HERE to donate.

Can you work out too hard?

Yes. You can work out too hard for a whole slew of reasons.

The NY Times focuses on one of these reasons in an article entitled: “As Workouts Intensify, a Harmful Side Effect Grows More Common“. One woman highlighted in the article suffered some serious consequences from what should have been just a hard day at the spin studio.

“Over the next two days, her legs throbbed with excruciating pain, her urine turned a dark shade of brown, and she felt nauseated. Eventually she went to a hospital, where she was told she had rhabdomyolysis, a rare but life-threatening condition often caused by extreme exercise. It occurs when overworked muscles begin to die and leak their contents into the bloodstream, straining the kidneys and causing severe pain.” Ouch. This does not sound good.

So were you right all along and all of this workout nonsense was a lie? Is sitting on the couch safer? Not really. You should “workout” or exercise everyday if possible. You just need to remember two things first:

1) Fitness – what am I trying to get fit for? Do I want to play with my kids/grandkids without huffing and puffing? Do I want to ride my bike in the summer charity ride each year? Do I want to do better in summer ultimate or do I want to win my age category and some fitness-related sporting event. Have a serious chat with yourself to figure out where you should start your journey back to fitness. If you are looking to compete at a high level no matter what your age, consider getting a coach to help you build a plan and recognize problems and injuries.

2) Adapt – take your time getting into your new regime. Work your way up slowly, perhaps adding 10% or less of weight, resistance, time etc to your work outs each week. Take at least a day off a week to recover with some walking or yoga. Listen to your body and cut back when you are aware of over training symptoms such as elevated heart rate while working out (higher than usual), elevated heart rate when you wake up in the morning (take it every morning for a week to get a baseline) or are you having trouble sleeping? More ornery than usual? (Be honest).

So workout good. Workout too much and too soon less good.

If you are interested in more content like this to motivate you to get back to the fitness you once had,  Click HERE to sign up for their newsletter.

Grads & Dads Watch This Video Today!

You other folks can watch it too . . .

Here is a recording of one of the best commencement speeches around save maybe Steve Jobs’ at Stanford. The speaker is Naval Admiral William McRaven, a former commander of Special Operations and a Navy Seal.

What other great commencement speeches or for that matter TED talks etc have you seen that you found motivating?

The 10 Commandments of Lifelong Fitness

ned-overendNed Overend is a legend in endurance sports. And, at age 61 he keeps on competing at an amazingly high level.

Here is a list of some of his accomplishments over the years: 1) 6 time NORBA U.S. Mountain Biking Champion in the late 80s and early 90s. 2) UCI World Mountain Biking Champion in 1990. 3) 2 time XTERRA World Champion in 1998 and 1999. 4) UCI Masters Cyclecross World Champion in 2012. 5) 2015 USA Cycling National Fat Bike Champion.

Earlier this year Outside Magazine did a profile of Overend that is worth a read. If you are short for time, however, one key aspect of the piece was Overend’s list of the 10 Commandments of Lifelong Fitness.

10 Commandments of Lifelong Fitness

  1. Mix it up – Cross train with other activities aside from your main focus. Do different things in different seasons like switching to snow shoeing in the winter from running.
  2. Make fitness fun – Avoid too much structure in your schedule. Give yourself permission to have fun.
  3. Never lose fitness – It is much harder to get your fitness back as you get older so don’t lose it.
  4. Pay attention to potential injuries – If you notice a pain somewhere, don’t ignore it. Slow down or take the day off and go get a massage.
  5. Recover harder then you train – High intensity workouts are still good but high intensity recovery needs to follow.
  6. Understand the science – Understand what your body is going through and why.
  7. Know your gear – If you want to stay competitive and not get hurt, you need to understand your gear, you need to maintain it and you need to replace it when it is unsafe or worn down.
  8. Stay positive – Getting older brings new challenges so stay positive and don’t give up.
  9. Be in control – Losing control often leads to injury and you can’t afford injuries and lay offs as much when you are older.
  10. Focus on yourself – Compete with yourself more and with others less. We are all in different situations, with more or less time to train and different genetics.

If all of this sounds familiar it is because Overend subscribes to the training tenets of coach Joe Friel.

“Ned lives what I preach,” says Joe Friel, 72, masters coach and author of Fast After 50. “He’s always been a fan of short workouts with high intensity.” Whittled down, the recipe for success as a geezer is this: 1) Decrease volume and increase intensity. 2) Recover, recover, recover. 3) Don’t stop training, ever; you can retain much of your VO2 max as you age, but once you lose it, it’s a lot harder to get it back. “When you’re 60, you can’t take a month off at the end of the season, have a good time like younger athletes can,” Friel says. “There’s an accelerated loss of fitness. Take Greg LeMond, for example—he just quit. Hung it up. Ned never did that.”

There is more on Joe Friel here in another BoomerangFit post.

What do you do to stay fit after 50?

The Meaning of Life

Are you risking too much or too little?

Screen Shot 2016-08-28 at 2.03.14 PMIn a great video called Never Stop, sponsored by The North Face, Jimmy Chin ponders the meaning of life. Jimmy Chin is an excellent skier, climber and photographer. Somehow Chin caught the skiing and climbing bug despite growing up in Mankato, MN and attending  Carleton College in Northfield, MN. I also went to Carleton and can attest to the lack of any hills or mountains in Minnesota.

Now Chin is a North Face sponsored athlete who among many other accomplishments has climbed to the top of Everest and then skied down. You read that right. He has had photos published in Outside Magazine and National Geographic and also recently produced, directed, shot and starred in a stunning film called Meru, about his climb with two friends to the top of a foreboding peak in the Karakoram mountains between India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and China. This film won the U.S. Documentary Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival and is definitely worth watching.

So what does Jimmy Chin think about the meaning of life:

“I guess I have always been driven to see what happens if I really throw myself at something. I learned early on that unless you really do that you will never find out. And, I think that would be really sad if I didn’t ever find my true potential. In a way, this is almost like the meaning of life. Finding a purpose and then pushing yourself in that space no matter what it is.”

“There are two great risks in life: risking too much and risking too little. The one that scares me the most is risking too little because you are given this great opportunity and you should make the post of it.”

This sounds a lot like the Ancient Greek concept of Arete. According to Wikipedia, “Arete is frequently associated with bravery, but more often with effectiveness. The man or woman of Arete is a person of the highest effectiveness; they use all their faculties—strength, bravery and wit—to achieve real results” or perhaps we could call it reaching their potential.

Are you reaching your potential? Are you throwing yourself at anything? Are you risking too much or too little?