Drop 35 Pounds in 4 Months

And be better at your job too

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Keith Krach (via Business Insider)

Losing 35 pounds in 4 months is pretty impressive. It sounds like it could be the title of a late night infomercial, but it isn’t.

This great feat was accomplished by Keith Krach, the CEO of tech company Docusign, and was highlighted recently in an article in Business Insider – Why the CEO of this $3 billion startup just dropped 35 points in 4 months.

What was more interesting is why he did it. “Krach says there wasn’t any clear motivation aside from an open-ended commitment he’d made with his two sons that he’d get in his best physical shape since college before the age of 60.”

This is a commitment we should all be making and is the commitment that is essentially at the crux of BoomerangFit. Lets all commit to ourselves, our families and our friends to get in the best physical shape that we have been in since college before we turn 60 or just pick and age that works for you. This is a fabulous goal and is more doable than most people think.

“Krach’s weight-loss regimen comprised of a strict low-carb/high-protein diet and a daily workout program that involved heavy lifting.”

After losing the weight Krach said that he could “narrow down the benefits to the following three reasons: high energy level, better sleep, and an improved clarity of thinking.”

What commitment will you make to yourself?

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Please consider sponsoring BoomerangFit’s climb of Mt Baker to raise money for the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund by clicking HERE. Since its founding, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed more than $38,000,000 to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for a number of key breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. Fully 100 percent of funds raised by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund go directly to research—the Board of Directors covers all overhead expenses.

How To Get Six Back Abs by Next Tuesday!

Six Pack AbsHave you ever seen or clicked on an ad like this? I saw one today for something similar and clicked on it to find out what they were saying.

It turns out it was an exercise and diet program for men over 40  and promised as advertised “6 Pack Abs”. Not by next Tuesday but you get the idea. By the way, any advertisement that promises that you can lose weight, reduce the size of your clothes or improve your health by only exercising and not improving your nutrition is simply not sustainable.

Given the proper amount of discipline, the right diet and an exercise program, I am sure it is possible for someone over 40 to get a six pack. The question is why would that be your goal?

From what I hear in talking to most people in their 40s and 50s, there are a number of things they would want before even considering six pack abs.

First and foremost, people in this age group tell me that they want to be “Fit”. What does this mean? Fit can mean in good health but can also mean to be prepared for something or some activity. My goal could be to be “fit” enough to walk around the block with my dog if now I can’t do that. My goal could be to be “fit” enough to climb a mountain such as I am currently focused on.

Fit for a purpose of course depends on your purpose. If your purpose is to be an underwear or bathing suit model six-pack abs could be a goal worth achieving. If your purpose is to live long enough to see your grandchildren graduate college or to be able to walk 18 holes or play tennis, your goals could be dramatically different. I would argue that striving for mobility, energy, being happy with how you look in general, fitting well into your clothes, etc all may be better goals than six pack abs.

What I hear second most often is that people want to get “into shape”. What does this mean? “Shape” to me implies the way you look not, for example, the way you feel or what you can do. A shape is a circle or a square or whatever shape that you interpret as being desirable for yourself. As we all probably know, you can be in a desirable shape while not being healthy or fit for any purpose.

So save your money and don’t click on the Six Pack Abs advertisements unless you truly believe that your goal should be to get one. If your goals are more reasonable such as being able to move comfortably, to have enough energy to achieve your other goals, to extend not only the length but also the quality of your life, then just eat as little added sugar and processed food as possible, move slowly often and lift something heavy and move quickly only occasionally.

Has anyone attempted a six-pack ab program? What were your results?

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Please consider sponsoring BoomerangFit’s climb of Mt Baker to raise money for the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund by clicking HERE. Since its founding, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed more than $38,000,000 to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for a number of key breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. Fully 100 percent of funds raised by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund go directly to research—the Board of Directors covers all overhead expenses.

What If We Didn’t Say What If Anymore?

The most dangerous phrase on earth!

“What if” could be the most dangerous phrase you may use on a regular basis. Many of us don’t even use it very frequently out loud, but it still can have a major impact on our livesScreen Shot 2016-06-02 at 1.57.41 PM. Think about the last time you considered doing something new and different. Out of your comfort zone. Did you quickly follow that thought with a “What If”? What if it rains? What if they don’t come? What if I don’t do well? What if I stopped saying “What If”?

First of all, nobody is perfect and things sometimes go wrong. So just expect it, be prepared and go try something new anyway. Second, what if the things that you “What If” about aren’t very likely to happen? Doesn’t this mean that you are holding yourself back for the most part for no reason?

Also, why is the “What If” usually negative and not positive? Why not: What if I meet my future spouse at this event? What if I discover a great lifelong hobby today? What if I discover something new and wonderful? Where are those awesome “What Ifs” hiding when I say “What If”?

One theory is that thousands of years ago there were many more things in the world to worry about: Lots of wild carnivorous animals. Bad weather with no shelter. The Ice Age. Even if you stumbled and sprained your ankle or broke a bone, you would most likely die. Back then the “What If” and specifically the negative “What Ifs” served an important purpose.

Now, not so much. Now our risks are a lot fewer and far between, at least the risks that are real and potentially deadly as opposed to the risk that you forgot to set the DVR to record the Kardashians. More frequently now, “What If” just gets in the way of experiencing life to its fullest and reaching your potential.

Fast forward to your death bed. What if I experienced more and listened to the negative “What Ifs” less? Will we regret more the things we have done or more the things we have wanted to do but didn’t? What do you think?

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Please consider sponsoring BoomerangFit’s climb of Mt Baker to raise money for the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund by clicking HERE. Since its founding, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed more than $38,000,000 to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for a number of key breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. Fully 100 percent of funds raised by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund go directly to research—the Board of Directors covers all overhead expenses.

 

Why MyFitnessPal drives me crazy

While I am not a big fan of food diaries as a long term tool, they can be useful for a number of reasons in the short term.  For example, if you are trying to build a new habit say of eating fewer carbs, tracking your intake for awhile can be useful. Or, if you are training for an event like I am training to climb a mountain in July, you can ensure that you are getting enough protein and carbs to support continued progress while ramping up training. The food diary I have been using is called MyFitnessPal. It has a great iPhone app, is now owned by Under Armour and it integrates with a number of exercise and fitness trackers.

Why a warning for Saturated Fat and not Sugar?

Why a warning for Saturated Fat and not Sugar?

What I don’t understand about MyFitnessPal, however, is their notification or warning system.

Selective Warnings

If I add a tablespoon of Coconut Oil to my daily food diary, I will get a warning notification that says: “This Food is High in Saturated Fat” with no explanation (see photo). A tablespoon of Coconut Oil has about 14 grams of Fat, mostly saturated, and 130 calories according to MyFitnessPal. If however, I add a Snickers Bar to my daily food diary, I get no yellow notification regarding Saturated Fat even though the amount of Saturated Fat is similar. What’s the difference?

Why No Warning for Sugar?

Additionally, a Snickers Bar contains 33 grams or 132 calories of sugar. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently reduced its recommended daily intake of sugar for a normal weight adult to 25 grams of sugar (this is per day remember). The Snickers Bar represents 132% of the recommended daily intake of sugar in one bar but there is no warning that says “This Food is High in Sugar”. Why not?

Is Saturated Fat Really A Problem

The next question is why does MyFitnessPal even have warnings for Saturated Fat when recent studies have shown that it is not as harmful as once thought and apparently doesn’t increase the incidence of heart disease. According to a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease, there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD (Coronary Hearth Disease) or CVD (Cardiovascular Disease). Additionally, where the Saturated Fat comes from can be very important. Does it come from industrial beef or grass fed beef, industrial pork or organic coconut oil? There is no difference according to MyFitnessPal. More on eating meat HERE.

Sugar is Really the Problem

Meanwhile, good old sugar is where the problem really lies but MyFitnessPal doesn’t deem it worthy of any warning or notification.  According to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine, “most US adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet” and “we observed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and increased risk for CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) mortality.

MyFitnessPal Needs to Get with the Times

According to the latest research, Saturated Fat is not as bad as we once thought especially when it comes from a clean natural source such as Coconut Oil or Grass Fed Beef. Additionally, sugar is emerging as the true villain when it comes to obesity, metabolic syndrome and various diseases like Alzheimer’s Disease, Heart Disease and Cancer. So lets get with the program MyFitnessPal and start focusing more on guiding people away from sugar and less on fat that it turns out wasn’t so bad after all.

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Please consider sponsoring BoomerangFit’s climb of Mt Baker to raise money for the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund by clicking HERE. Since its founding, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed more than $38,000,000 to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for a number of key breakthroughs. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund supports some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. Fully 100 percent of funds raised by Cure Alzheimer’s Fund go directly to research—the Board of Directors covers all overhead expenses.

Alzheimer’s Can Happen to Anyone

Triathlon Cofounder Jack Johnstone Dies of Alzheimer's

All America Swimmer and co-founder of the Triathlon

All America Swimmer and co-founder of the Triathlon, Jack Johnstone

The world’s of triathlon and Alzheimer’s came crashing together yesterday when Jack Johnstone, the co-founder of the triathlon, died after battling Alzheimer’s since 2013.

An All-American swimmer, Johnstone took up running later in life and, in San Diego in 1977 with his friend Don Shanahan, started the sport of Triathlon. Now nearly 40 years later, triathlon has millions of participants in the U.S. alone and is an Olympic sport.

Today, 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, up to 16 million will have the disease.  Payments for care in 2012 were estimated to be $200 billion. Without a cure, these figures will nearly triple by the year 2050.  Aside from the horror of living with this disease or caring for people with it, we simply can’t afford this disease to continue to grow. Our healthcare system will go bankrupt.

If you are an athlete contemplating your 2016 goals and challenges, I urge you to consider combining these activities with raising money to cure Alzheimer’s. I lost my grandmother and my mother to this disease and my Aunt is now struggling with it as well. My brother and I are currently planning to climb Mt Baker in 2016 to raise money for CureAlzheimer’s. This mountain, out in the Northern Cascades in Washington state stands 10,781 feet tall so our fundraising goal will be $10,781.  If you would like to raise money through your active efforts this year or simply donate to our efforts, please click HERE